1. showand:

stillspotting (queens) nyc:  Transhistoria by SO – IL 
Self-guided tour experience from artists by the Guggenheim’s stillspotting nyc series, this time focusing on Jackson Heights, Queens. Inspiration for how one might communicate the breadth/history of a community of color by inviting participants to visit six locations and hear three stories of people, representing experiences of immigrants, trans folks, and women. 

For Transhistoria, the third edition ofstillspotting nyc, the architects at Solid Objectives – Idenburg Liu (SO – IL) explore how one finds calm and inner peace in a bustling environment such as Jackson Heights. How do its residents, who often have roots elsewhere, achieve a sense of home and familiarity in a post-national living situation? And what urged them to leave their old households and countries in the first place?
Official histories on migration tend to stress economic or political motives for relocation without giving much attention to individual and cultural narratives. One important but largely ignored aspect, however, remains the flight from problematic domestic situations. Think of a young woman who leaves to escape her strict mother, a transgender individual who feels underappreciated by town elders, or a man who never returns home to his family after stepping out for a pack of cigarettes. These types of everyday stories open up a different enquiry in the search for identity and home away from home.
In two-hour self-guided tours starting from the Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Ave. station,Transhistoria visitors will encounter four of these personal transhistories, selected from a series of around six indoor and outdoor spaces that frame the special experiences of these stories of migration, displacement, and finding familiarity and identity in a new place.
A ticket to Transhistoria grants access to four of six possible locations for readings in Jackson Heights, Queens, initiating from a stillspotting ticket kiosk just south of the Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Ave transit hub at 40-40 75th Street. View a map of the stillspotting ticketing kiosk.
Hours are Saturdays and Sundays, April 14–15, 21–22, 28–29, and May 5–6, 11am–7pm with the last tour starting at 5pm. Visitors will receive a map, directions for a self-guided tour, and a wristband for access to four sites that they may choose from the six sites open daily. A full visit to four sites takes approximately two hours, and visitors may customize their route or make other stops along the way as there is no suggested itinerary.
Discounted rates are available for groups of ten or more. Advanced registration is strongly suggested. A program for families will be offered as part of Transhistoria on Saturdays April 21 and May 5 from 12–3pm with a story written expressly for families performed in a public space in Jackson Heights.

The concept and approach are fascinating and apparently meditate on concepts of “home” instead of finding “stillness” as was the focus in previous stillspotting incarnations. Always interested to see how outsider/insider, artist/subject, middle-class/working-class/poor and other tensions produce interpretations of the complex social/community formations of a place like Jackson Heights. More to come on this…

    showand:

    stillspotting (queens) nyc: 
    Transhistoria by SO – IL
     

    Self-guided tour experience from artists by the Guggenheim’s stillspotting nyc series, this time focusing on Jackson Heights, Queens. Inspiration for how one might communicate the breadth/history of a community of color by inviting participants to visit six locations and hear three stories of people, representing experiences of immigrants, trans folks, and women. 

    For Transhistoria, the third edition ofstillspotting nyc, the architects at Solid Objectives – Idenburg Liu (SO – IL) explore how one finds calm and inner peace in a bustling environment such as Jackson Heights. How do its residents, who often have roots elsewhere, achieve a sense of home and familiarity in a post-national living situation? And what urged them to leave their old households and countries in the first place?

    Official histories on migration tend to stress economic or political motives for relocation without giving much attention to individual and cultural narratives. One important but largely ignored aspect, however, remains the flight from problematic domestic situations. Think of a young woman who leaves to escape her strict mother, a transgender individual who feels underappreciated by town elders, or a man who never returns home to his family after stepping out for a pack of cigarettes. These types of everyday stories open up a different enquiry in the search for identity and home away from home.

    In two-hour self-guided tours starting from the Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Ave. station,Transhistoria visitors will encounter four of these personal transhistories, selected from a series of around six indoor and outdoor spaces that frame the special experiences of these stories of migration, displacement, and finding familiarity and identity in a new place.

    A ticket to Transhistoria grants access to four of six possible locations for readings in Jackson Heights, Queens, initiating from a stillspotting ticket kiosk just south of the Jackson Heights–Roosevelt Ave transit hub at 40-40 75th Street. View a map of the stillspotting ticketing kiosk.

    Hours are Saturdays and Sundays, April 14–15, 21–22, 28–29, and May 5–6, 11am–7pm with the last tour starting at 5pm. Visitors will receive a map, directions for a self-guided tour, and a wristband for access to four sites that they may choose from the six sites open daily. A full visit to four sites takes approximately two hours, and visitors may customize their route or make other stops along the way as there is no suggested itinerary.

    Discounted rates are available for groups of ten or more. Advanced registration is strongly suggested. A program for families will be offered as part of Transhistoria on Saturdays April 21 and May 5 from 12–3pm with a story written expressly for families performed in a public space in Jackson Heights.

    The concept and approach are fascinating and apparently meditate on concepts of “home” instead of finding “stillness” as was the focus in previous stillspotting incarnations. Always interested to see how outsider/insider, artist/subject, middle-class/working-class/poor and other tensions produce interpretations of the complex social/community formations of a place like Jackson Heights. More to come on this…

Notes

  1. jacksonheights reblogged this from showand
  2. showand posted this